Welcome, visitor! [ Register | Login

Loading...

Watch Skeem Saam on SABC 1 weekdays at 6:30pm

Entertainment December 30, 2015

Skeem Saam

Skeem Saam is a 30 minutes tv series that airs weekdays on SABC 1 at 6:30 pm.

Catch the exciting youth drama Skeem Saam Mondays to Fridays on SABC 1! Focusing on the exhilarating voyage to adulthood, for some of our friends in Turfloop, life has become almost unrecognisable. Coming of age has a tendency to do that to individuals and to a community. Episodes are repeated at 10:00 the next day on SABC 1.

If you ever wondered what’s going to happen tomorrow on skeem saam – 8c.co.za will published monthly skeem teasers

Feedback and

Ratings

According to SABC 1

Skeem Saam is a blend of stories about the journey to manhood. The local drama series examines the plight of today’s male children and the tough challenges they face ‘transitioning’ into manhood.
Teenage boys naturally challenge themselves. They wish to find out what their limits are. Will they survive to see their 21st birthday? Who will grow into a healthy, responsible man? What are the responsibilities of close relations and neighbours towards shaping the next generation of men?

Assupol

Skeem Saam is a captivating youth drama series on SABC 1.

IMDB

(11 ratings so far)

Eric Macheru – Leeto (14 episodes, 2013)
Cornet Thabiso Mamabolo – Tbose (14 episodes, 2013)
Harriet Manamela – Meikie / Meikie Maputla (14 episodes, 2013)
Clement Maosa – Kwaito (14 episode, 2013)
Lerato Marabe- Pretty (14 episodes, 2013)
Lesego Marakalla – Rachel Kunutu (14 episodes, 2013)
Dieketseng Mnisi – Ma Ntuli (14 episodes, 2013)
Lidia Mokgolokoshi – Granny (14 episodes, 2013)
Paulina Motlatswi – Mapitsi (14 episodes, 2013)
Patrick Seleka – Katlego (14 episodes, 2013)
Africa Tsoai – John Maputla (13 episodes, 2013)
Traverse Le Goff – Edward Brown (1 episode, 2015)

SABC 2

Skeem Saam is a ground-breaking and captivating youth drama series.

The exhilarating voyage on the river to adulthood never stops. Series three of Skeem Saam starts in winter, a time of transition. For some of the friends in Turfloop, life has become almost unrecognisable. Coming of age has a tendency to do that to individuals and to a community. How does the exciting journey to adulthood continue? Tbose struggles to balance being a student and a father; and the question of whether he and Mapitsi can be together leads both of them down many winding, heart breaking lanes.

Katlego has to face the realisation that having Granny and his mother in the same house brings challenges he never anticipated facing at this stage in his life. Kwaito finally sees the light at the end of the tunnel that was his barren love-life. The problem is once the floodgates open he has no control over them. He finds himself embroiled in love-triangles that threaten to destroy everything that is precious to him. This season Kwaito meets Lelo; a woman who changes his life in ways no one could ever imagine. The Kunutu’s face seemingly insurmountable challenges as MaKunutu struggles to carve out a place for herself in a community that fears she will one day try to avenge her husband’s untimely death. Things get especially complicated when she comes to the realisation that her daughter Rachel has fallen for the wrong guy. This is just the beginning of the transitions we are about to go through. This season we spend time with the residents of Turfloop every weekday. We watch their lives unfold on a daily basis. Tbose and Kwaito transcend from High School to University. They spread their wings, leave the nest of Turfloop and venture into the bright dazzling lights of Johannesburg, where more escapades await them. While the pace of the two boys’ lives spiral uncontrollably, their parents discover that the empty nest syndrome is not just a concept.

75 total views, 1 today

Why Poldark is the TV hit of the year

Entertainment April 28, 2015

Preposterous as all this might have seemed to some at the more cold-hearted end of the viewer spectrum, for those of us swept up in the onrushing drama it was impossible not to capitulate to the sweeping romance of it.

“Today I was asked when I realized I was in the wrong body. As much as it took me a really long time to come to terms with it, I think I have known since I can remember—since I could even think about gender or notice it. I was thinking about when I was in pre-K ,and I would dress up as Cinderella and do girl things. If I decided to wear a dress or roleplay as a princess, my teachers would tell me I couldn’t do it because I was a boy. So when you have everyone in your life telling you that you’re a boy, you kind of start to believe it, even though none of it comes naturally to you.

Eleanor Tomlinson as Demelza (Photo: BBC)

Eleanor Tomlinson as Demelza (Photo: BBC)

My transition has been a very gradual, very cerebral process. For a lot of people, it’s very easy to reduce gender to bodies, and that’s terrible. So to answer that question that I was asked today, I realized I was a woman after I was already living as a woman for about a year or so. Before that, I had this platinum blond hair, acrylics, and would dress in skirts, and wear purses—but I still identified as male. I was open-minded enough, growing up, to think that even if my outward appearance was female, I could still be male. If you read enough queer theory, you realize any sort of conjunction is possible. There are boys who want experience life as women but still be boys, and that’s valid.

I never understood why people would think that men couldn’t be as beautiful as women, so for a long time I didn’t have a word for myself. I was like, ‘I’m not a boy but I can’t let myself be a woman.’ So at the time I was like, ‘OK, I’ll be something else.’ It was weird for me, and in some ways, my thinking allowed me to keep putting off how I felt inside by just covering it up with this cerebral explanation.

[blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]There is a lot of psychological tension in trying to discuss anything with gender identity.[/blockquote]

I used to wear a lot more makeup. I fucking love Boy George, and I would put on that amount of makeup—like Boy George amounts of makeup. My eyeliner would like reach my hairline. I would go really crazy with it. I would try to overcompensate. Now I’m much more toned down, but I feel like all girls have that phase when experimenting with makeup for the first time. Though, if I started off putting on the amount of makeup I wear now, I knew I would just look like who I really am, and I think I was just not ready for that.

I was 14 years old when I got my first taste of makeup. I was in a band as the lead singer and we were playing one of our first shows. At that point all I could get away with was straightening my hair maybe once a month. So yeah, I was at my first show, and I remember finding a Revlon retractable black eyeliner in the bathroom. I put it on my waterline, not even thinking about the fact that I could get an eye infection as I picked it up off the floor—it was disgusting. I guess the cool thing about being in a band is that there is so much more freedom. There’s the classic ‘Dude (Looks Like A Lady)‘-feel. I felt like I could wear the eyeliner, and no one would care because I was at a rock show. Then I wore it again to a crowd that was more of a hardcore scene, and it wasn’t a cool experience. They were screaming at me to get off the stage and calling me the F word. I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’ I was 15 at that point. It was a terrible wake up call to me, all because I was wearing eyeliner—it’s not that big of a deal, and yet, people are already policing me for not performing this gender that I’m pretending to be. Obviously I was doing a shitty job at performing male. Sometimes I tell people that I really feel like I was in drag for over a decade, in the sense of performing male gender roles. I’d end the night and make sure to wipe off my eyeliner before I got home.

poldark2_3280375b

So much attention was focused on star Aidan Turner, it was easy to overlook the other virtues. His capacity to combine Heathcliffean brooding with matinee idol looks (and that much-feted scene in which, oiled-up and stripped to the waist, he went to mow a meadow) set hearts aflutter and the media into overdrive. And rightly so. In fact, it was often the clench-jawed conviction of Turner’s performance that stopped Poldark slipping into complete ludicrousness on occasion.

Eleanor Tomlinson shone, too, transforming the nit-infested urchin Demelza into a 21st-century woman at home in 18th-century Cornwall. Turner may have got the adulation, but it was the screen chemistry conjured between these two that put much of the fizz into Poldark.

Never more so than in this episode’s scenes where Demelza, at death’s door momentarily, drew from Ross the confession that she had supplanted his childhood sweetheart Elizabeth as “the love of [his] life”.

The only other thing that could have been thrown at this finale to make it more Cornishly dramatic was a shipwreck. And so we got one, handsomely done, as the nasty Warleggans’ new vessel, the Queen Charlotte, foundered on her maiden voyage.

Washing ashore not only a bellyful of plunder for Ross’s starving workers, but a gratifying note of poetic justice done – albeit soon to be whipped away by the winds of fate and that clifftop, cliffhanger arrest.

poldark3_3280374b

“T’aint right, t’aint fit, t’aint fair, t’aint proper,” some will have chanted, familiar now with the vernacular. But really, it’s hard to imagine a more tantalisingly satisfying ending, containing as it did the promise of a second series (already commissioned) replete with as much high drama as the first.

Given that the Seventies Poldark ran to 29 episodes, and Graham’s novels number 12 (only two of which were plundered for this series), it’s safe to assume that not only one more run of adventures, but many, lie ahead for Cap’n Ross and his much-admired chest.

20 total views, 0 today

Game of Thrones, season six: news and rumours

Entertainment April 27, 2015

Does it matter if the show is deviating from Martin’s books? … The latest news on the cast, characters, directors and writers of Game of Thrones season five.

“Today I was asked when I realized I was in the wrong body. As much as it took me a really long time to come to terms with it, I think I have known since I can remember—since I could even think about gender or notice it. I was thinking about when I was in pre-K ,and I would dress up as Cinderella and do girl things. If I decided to wear a dress or roleplay as a princess, my teachers would tell me I couldn’t do it because I was a boy. So when you have everyone in your life telling you that you’re a boy, you kind of start to believe it, even though none of it comes naturally to you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9Bo89m2f6g
My transition has been a very gradual, very cerebral process. For a lot of people, it’s very easy to reduce gender to bodies, and that’s terrible. So to answer that question that I was asked today, I realized I was a woman after I was already living as a woman for about a year or so. Before that, I had this platinum blond hair, acrylics, and would dress in skirts, and wear purses—but I still identified as male. I was open-minded enough, growing up, to think that even if my outward appearance was female, I could still be male. If you read enough queer theory, you realize any sort of conjunction is possible. There are boys who want experience life as women but still be boys, and that’s valid.

I never understood why people would think that men couldn’t be as beautiful as women, so for a long time I didn’t have a word for myself. I was like, ‘I’m not a boy but I can’t let myself be a woman.’ So at the time I was like, ‘OK, I’ll be something else.’ It was weird for me, and in some ways, my thinking allowed me to keep putting off how I felt inside by just covering it up with this cerebral explanation.

[blockquote author=”” pull=”normal”]There is a lot of psychological tension in trying to discuss anything with gender identity.[/blockquote]

I used to wear a lot more makeup. I fucking love Boy George, and I would put on that amount of makeup—like Boy George amounts of makeup. My eyeliner would like reach my hairline. I would go really crazy with it. I would try to overcompensate. Now I’m much more toned down, but I feel like all girls have that phase when experimenting with makeup for the first time. Though, if I started off putting on the amount of makeup I wear now, I knew I would just look like who I really am, and I think I was just not ready for that.

I was 14 years old when I got my first taste of makeup. I was in a band as the lead singer and we were playing one of our first shows. At that point all I could get away with was straightening my hair maybe once a month. So yeah, I was at my first show, and I remember finding a Revlon retractable black eyeliner in the bathroom. I put it on my waterline, not even thinking about the fact that I could get an eye infection as I picked it up off the floor—it was disgusting. I guess the cool thing about being in a band is that there is so much more freedom. There’s the classic ‘Dude (Looks Like A Lady)‘-feel. I felt like I could wear the eyeliner, and no one would care because I was at a rock show. Then I wore it again to a crowd that was more of a hardcore scene, and it wasn’t a cool experience. They were screaming at me to get off the stage and calling me the F word. I was just like, ‘Wow, OK.’ I was 15 at that point. It was a terrible wake up call to me, all because I was wearing eyeliner—it’s not that big of a deal, and yet, people are already policing me for not performing this gender that I’m pretending to be. Obviously I was doing a shitty job at performing male. Sometimes I tell people that I really feel like I was in drag for over a decade, in the sense of performing male gender roles. I’d end the night and make sure to wipe off my eyeliner before I got home.

gota2_3263330b

I had really bad acne in high school, so I’d get away with wearing coverall and that’s it. Still, my mother would look at me from her bed—I did, and still do, my makeup in her room because it has the best lighting—and be like, ‘What are you doing?’ I used to tell my mom like, ‘Don’t worry! I’ll never wear mascara!’ But it all happens…100 YouTube tutorials later you emerge in full face [Laughs].

I always admired makeup. I’d watch my grandma doing her makeup, and she’d always be put together. She would tell me that photos are forever, you can’t take it lightly, and you have to perfect it. Little things like that really stuck with me. Without my mother’s permission, I dyed my hair platinum blonde as a teenager. Having white hair changes your life, regardless of gender identity. It is a really crazy experience. You learn about so many different sides of people and how they perceive you—it’s crazy. It was motivation, I guess, and it was the first instance of feeling like I can’t hide myself.

I was really obsessed with Final Fantasy at the time, especially the Final Fantasy villains. If you really look at a Final Fantasy villain and analyze it, it’s a female head on a male body. I felt connected to the possibility of being really pretty, even if my body didn’t match up—there was a chance for the head portion to be on-point and consistent with how I view myself. After that, I started really diving into makeup as identity. Beauty can be a big deal for all girls, but beauty for a trans girl could be life-or-death. There’s moments when you could be placed in danger for not passing as a woman convincingly enough. One time I was walking with my friend and a guy was trying to holler at me, then he took out a knife. Makeup is much more serious to trans women. Even cis girls can relate—they get attacked and bullied in schools, growing up, because they’re not pretty enough.

I really feel bad for a lot of trans people and trans women who don’t have the experience [with makeup] before they come into themselves and have to learn to do their makeup in no time. They’re 35, they have kids, and they need to transition then—that’s the bravest thing ever. That’s not to say that I think people transitioning later in life necessarily need to wear makeup to be who they are. I just identified with it. The way I did it was just like how every girl picks up makeup skills—where your mom is like, ‘You can only put on lipgloss.’ You need time to practice, so it looks good. I used to just have these Zen three-hour makeup sessions. Of course, during the day I just wear tinted moisturizer, concealer, and maybe mascara. Sometimes I’ll do a wing, but just a little bit on the outer edge. But at night…at night is when I’d really take my time. I’d do my makeup from 7pm to 10pm and go out at midnight.

18 total views, 0 today

Mel B Fights back as she returns to the X Factor live final after mystery illness

Entertainment April 27, 2015

Well, well, well, what do we have here? It’s only bloomin’ Mel B back on The X Factor. The judge missed the first half of this year’s live final after she was struck down with a serious illness.

She was absent during Saturday night’s show when her last act Andrea Faustini came third place in the competition.But wet! Wearing it wet opens a whole new world of opportunity. “What you’re doing is bringing out the pigmented nature of the shadow,” makeup artist Vincent Oquendo says. “Whenever I wet an eye shadow, it’s when I really want it to pop—but it really has to be a special kind of product to be able to blend after it sets. Because a lot of the times when it sets, you get streaking.” Nobody wants that. In order to avoid any wet shadow mishaps, follow these guidelines:

https://twitter.com/anteksiler/status/565447804819369985

Product

Andrea returned for the final night - aww!

Andrea returned for the final night – aww!

First, go with the obvious: any eye shadow labeled wet-to-dry. The Nars Dual-Intensity line is the standout—the singles come in 12 different shimmery shades, and there’s a corresponding brush (then there’s the newly released Dual Intensity Blush line, which was all over Fashion Week—but that’s a product for another post). Burberry also makes a few very versatile shades specifically for this in their Wet & Dry Silk Shadows. And the technique-specific eye shadow category isn’t just a ploy to get you to buy more product. “You can’t just use any eye shadow for this,” Vincent says. “Certain ones will harden up on top and become unusable because they’re not made for this.”

Baked shadows are also fair game—we’re fans of Laura Mercier’s Baked Eye Colour Wet/Dry and Lorac’s Starry-Eyed Baked Eye Shadow Trio in particular.

For more advanced players, Vincent suggests moving on to straight pigment (MAC or even OCC’s Pure Cosmetic Pigments). With the added moisture, they’ll become easier to layer with other products. For a look with more depth, try using a cream shadow as a based before swiping with a wet powder shadow. “It’s like insurance,” Vincent says. “You’re doubling your wearability.

Brush
This all depends on exactly what you want to do. “Mind the resistance,” Vincent says, particularly if you’re looking for uniform color across the lid. “I tend to recommend a blender brush, which is the brush that looks like a feather duster. If you do it with a stiff brush, you’re defeating yourself before you even start. The joy of a wet-to-dry is you have to get it right amount of product loaded up, and then it blends itself. If the brush is too stiff, it will leave the shadow streaky and then much harder to control.”

However, if tightlining or waterlining is in the cards, a much thinner brush is required accordingly.

Liquid
Do not, repeat, do not put eye drops, water, or any other sort of liquid directly on your eye shadow. This’ll screw up your product for later use. “Lately, I’ve been wetting the brush with the Glossier Soothing Face Mist, but Evian Mineral Water Spray is good for sensitive eyes,” Vincent says. If the top of your powder does get a little hardened by wet application, there’s a trick to remove it: Get a clean mascara spoolie and “exfoliate” your compact, Vincent recommends. This won’t crack the compact and will make it ready to go once more.

Photographed by Tom Newton.

16 total views, 0 today

  • Minister of Water Affairs in Sudan

    The Minister of Water Affairs in Sudan

    by on March 28, 2017 - 0 Comments

    Here’s who everyone is talking about – The Minister of Water Affairs in Sudan. We may not know the fact and how real this is. Reports say:  The man pictured here is Hon. Mabior Garang De Mabior, the current minister for Water Resources and Irrigation in the Republic of South Sudan. Hon. De Mabior who […]

  • Sesethu video breaks the internet

    by on March 23, 2017 - 0 Comments

    Isn’t it sad what the world has become. There’s a 14 year old who is trending on Social Network known as #Sesethu. What is the story behind the Trend. There’s a video of a 14 year old (Sesethu) – In the video she is self stimulating herself with the hand for pleasure – I guess I […]

  • WHATSAPP APPLES - What's the deal with women and colourful apples on Whatsapp as Profile Pictures

    by on April 21, 2017 - 0 Comments

    COLORFUL WHATSAPP APPLES It is now confirmed as in yesterday that women are in fact DRAMATIC. All of this just to confuse men, and boy weren’t we just confused thinking it’s the end of the world or something. I actually thought it was a fruity day, no matter how much nonsense I was feeding myself, […]

  • SA Lotto Results

    SA Powerball Results - Friday 07 April 2017

    by on April 7, 2017 - 0 Comments

    Powerball and Plus Results: Friday 07 April 2017 The winning numbers for Friday 07 April 2017 Powerball  Draw. Here are the winning numbers (Powerball and Powerball Plus) (SA POWERBALL RESULTS) Powerball: 20, 21, 24, 34, 43 Powerball 20 Powerball Plus: 23, 29, 30, 31, 33 Powerball 20.  

  • #Sesethu - The Trend in South Africa

    by on March 24, 2017 - 0 Comments

    REPORTS: An unseemly video of a young lady, named Sesethu, is as of now doing the rounds via web-based networking media. A considerable measure of jokes have been made. Sharing the video and passing uncouth remarks about the young lady is online networking disgracing. While you may play around with your peeps on Twitter and […]